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Unlocking the Power of NPS: How UX Can Make or Break Your Results





Have you ever received an email asking you to answer an NPS survey, only to find yourself staring at a cluttered and confusing interface?

As a Customer, it can be frustrating to navigate through a poorly designed survey. As a business, low NPS feed-back can pollute your results and drive you to incorrect decisions. That's why it's crucial to prioritize user experience when it comes to gathering feedback from customers.

In this UX case study, we'll explore how Growth.Design was able to improve NPS response rates by revamping the user experience. You will learn about:

  1. Priming: This refers to the idea of setting expectations or providing context before asking for feedback. For example, if you want feedback on a new product feature, you could first explain what the feature is and why it was added.

  2. Hick's Law: This law suggests that the more options someone has to choose from, the longer it will take them to make a decision. To apply this to feedback collection, it's best to keep the survey or question as simple and straightforward as possible.

  3. Singularity Effect: This refers to the idea that people tend to remember the first and last items in a list more than the items in the middle. To apply this to feedback collection, it's best to put the most important questions at the beginning or end of a survey.

  4. Behavioral Consistency: This refers to the idea that people tend to behave in ways that are consistent with their previous behavior. To apply this to feedback collection, it's best to ask for feedback from customers who have already given feedback in the past.

  5. Progressive Disclosure: This refers to the idea of revealing information gradually rather than all at once. To apply this to feedback collection, it's best to ask simple questions at first and then gradually ask more complex questions.

If you're launching new surveys to your customers, you won't want to miss this demo

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